HELP DEFUND LINE 3: Enbridge Loan Due for Renewal March 31, 2021

A MESSAGE FROM TARA HOUSKA

On March 31st, 18 banks have a $2.2 billion loan to Enbridge that is due for renewal. Between now and then, we’re going to do everything in our power to make it loud and clear to the executives of those banks: They must walk away from Line 3 ― or there will be consequences.

Every week, we’re going to ask you to take an action that helps put pressure on those 18 banks funding Line 3. We’ll ask you to send direct emails to CEOs, call board members, take part in Covid-safe street protests, participate in projection actions, join online rallies and much more.

If enough of us take these actions together, we can make the companies funding Line 3 feel enough pressure that they will walk away from Enbridge.

We’re going to start today with one, easy action for you to take. Click here to send the CEOs of 18 major banks a message that they MUST walk away from Enbridge and Line 3 on March 31st.

For the last seven years, I have been fighting Line 3 with everything I have. If built, Line 3, a massive toxic tar sands pipeline, would destroy the sacred wild rice beds my people depend on for our food, our culture and our way of life. It would contribute as much to the climate crisis as 50 new coal-fired power plants. It would endanger 800 wetlands and 200 waterways.

Despite ongoing legal challenges from the Red Lake Nation, the White Earth Band of Ojibwe, and Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, Minnesota’s own Department of Commerce, environmental organizations, and 13 brave youth intervenors, construction of Line 3 continues ― bringing thousands of out-of-state workers to northern MN in the middle of a deadly pandemic, threatening already vulnerable rural, Indigenous communities with the virus even more.

As an Anishinaabe woman it is my duty to protect the water, the land, and my people. I am moved to act because I love the people, the four-legged, the winged, the finned, the land, the water.

It is my duty as an Anishinaabe woman that compels me to support people in taking direct action to stop the construction of Line 3. Direct action, like when Water Protectors recently locked themselves inside a section of pipeblockaded the entrances to construction sites, and locked themselves to trucks being used to carry Line 3 pipeline materials.

It is from this sense of duty that I am asking you to join us in this campaign. Together, I know that we can do this. Throughout history people-powered movements have changed the world. And they sure as hell can stop Line 3.

You can join the #DefundLine3 campaign and take your first action with us by clicking here and sending a direct email to Jamie Dimon and other Wall Street CEOs ― your email will go directly to the inboxes of CEOs, executives and board members of the banks funding Line 3.

Since the antiracist uprisings began last year, I have been proud to stand in solidarity with the demand of Black-led movements to defund the police. Indigenous people understand White Supremacist police brutality. Like Black folks of this country, we’ve faced it for centuries.

Now, just as racist police forces have brutalized Black and Indigenous bodies, Enbridge is brutalizing sacred Anishinaabe land ― and is being protected by a militarized police force paid for by a Candian oil company as it does so.

Together, we are powerful.

Miigwech
~ Tara Houska for Stop the Money Pipeline

Tara Houska (Couchiching First Nation Anishinaabe) is a tribal attorney, founder of Giniw Collective, and a former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders. She spent six months on the frontlines fighting the Dakota Access Pipeline, and is currently engaged in the movement to defund fossil fuels and a years-long struggle against Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline. She is a co-founder of Not Your Mascots, a group committed to positive representation of Native peoples.

She is a TED speaker, the 2017 Harvard “Public Interested” keynote, received an “Awesome Women Award” from Melinda Gates and a 2019 Rachel’s Network Catalyst Award, is featured in “Women: A Century of Change” by National Geographic, and was named an “Icon” on the cover of Outside Magazine’s 40th Anniversary edition. Tara has contributed to the women-led climate anthology “All We Can Save”, the New York Times, the Guardian, Vogue, Indian Country Today and been featured on CNN, MSNBC, CBS, Democracy Now, and BBC. She lives in a pipeline resistance camp in Northern Minnesota.

DOWNLOAD FULL PRESENTATION HERE

UDW Endorses Joe Rose for District 12 Ashland County Board

GREETINGS FROM JOE M. ROSE – CANDIDATE FOR ASHLAND COUNTY BOARD, DISTRICT 12

I have represented the citizens of District 12 for the past 6 years, and respectfully request your vote in the April 7, 2020 election.

I sincerely hope that all of you are safe and healthy as we each do our own part to help protect our families, friends, and communities from the coronavirus pandemic. Although it is difficult to think about other things at a time like this, we have many serious issues to consider as we look to the future.

The Ashland County Board consists of many different subcommittees, and as a board member I have served on several of them including: the Planning Committee, Large Scale Assembly Committee, Mining Impact Committee, and the Land and Water Conservation Committee. In addition, I currently serve as the Chairman of the Zoning Committee.

When the entire Bad River Watershed was threatened by proposed mountaintop mining in the Penokee Hills, the Zoning Committee conducted public hearings, developed taconite mining ordinances, and submitted them to the County Board who in turn voted to pass them. After several years of strong local resistance, the proposed project was finally scrapped. Shortly afterwards, the Wisconsin Mining Moratorium Law, which had been in effect for many years, was voted out of existence by the Wisconsin State Legislature. In response to local concerns regarding this loss of protection, the Zoning Committee conducted more public hearings, amended the County’s existing taconite mining ordinances to address the threat of potential sulfide mining as well, and submitted them to the County Board where they were approved.

Many local citizens will recall the proposed Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) in the Fish Creek Watershed of Bayfield County, which empties into Chequamegon Bay and Apostle Islands area of Lake Superior. With the increased frequency and intensity of flood events that have occurred in our area, many local citizens and communities were highly concerned about the potential risks involved with this proposed facility. In response, the Land and Water Conservation Committee of the Ashland County Board followed a similar path as Bayfield County by conducting public hearings, establishment of a study committee to gather information, and the development of CAFO-related ordinances that were ultimately approved by the Ashland County Board.

As you know, our area has experienced three major floods in the past six years. The Zoning Committee has initiated a process to develop Wetland Conservation ordinances to protect, restore, and enhance local wetland habitats, and help reduce flooding. In addition, the Land and Water Conservation Committee is currently exploring state and federal funding opportunities that would be used to initiate a pilot project to help address these wetland conservation needs. Hearings are being planned to provide information and obtain public input before these ordinances are presented to the County Board for approval.

However, the statewide travel restrictions that have been enacted to slow the spread of coronavirus may require these hearings to be postponed. I am deeply concerned about the potential risks associated with the presence of Enbridge Line 5 in our area, and with the increasing amount of influence that this foreign corporation appears to have on our local communities.

As a member of the Ashland County Board, I have worked with many local citizens and elected officials to help protect the health of our local lands and waters for area citizens and the generations yet to come. If re-elected, I will continue these efforts to the best of my ability. I request your support to continue these efforts for the next 2 years. As always, let your voice count and be sure to cast your vote in the April 7, 2020 election.

Realizing the number of coronavirus infections continues to increase throughout the state, many Wisconsin citizens may not feel comfortable about voting in person on April 7. Voters can request an absentee ballot online by going to http://www.myvote.wi.gov, click on Vote Absentee and then follow the required steps. You will need to enter your name and date of birth to confirm that you are a registered voter. If you do not have a photo ID on file with your local municipal clerk, you will need to upload a copy of your (acceptable) photo ID card in order to submit your absentee ballot request.

Please note that absentee ballot requests must be made no later than 5:00 p.m. on the Thursday before the election (April 2) in order for an absentee ballot to be sent to you. Voters can also contact their local clerk to request an absentee ballot via email or fax, by mail, or in person.

A directory of clerks can be found by going to http://www.myvote.wi.gov, click on Find My Polling Place at the top of the page, then click on Find My Clerk on the left hand side. After filling in your address, click on the Search button, and the contact information for your local clerk will be provided.

Authorized and paid for by Joe M. Rose

Winona LaDuke Winona “All Call” Party—Call for Submission for Native Artists

June 4, 2019

Winona LaDuke, nationally recognized Native activist, is turning 60 years old, and is calling all women with the name Winona—all the “First Daughters”—to bring themselves, families and friends to party in “their” town of Winona, Minnesota on weekend August 23-25, 2019. It is a Winona All Call, inviting Winonas and Winona lovers to Winona, MN to celebrate, explore and wax poetic on being Winona.

Winona, MN circa 1898

The name, Winona, comes from the Ojibwe creation story and is the mother of Nanaboozho. The Dakota also have the name Winona or Wenonah which means in both languages “first-born daughter.” The city of Winona is known for the legend of Princess Winona, the Miss Winona Pageant and many buildings bearing the name Winona. Winona, Minnesota will be the perfect town for Winonas to gather.

Winona LaDuke, keynote speaker for the Frozen River Film Festival in Winona, MN on Feb 17, 2015.

Winona LaDuke is executive director of Honor the Earth, Founder of Winona’s Hemp & Heritage Farm and Anishinaabe Agriculture, and is a two-time Green Party candidate for Vice President with Ralph Nader.

“There are hundreds of Native and non-Native women named Winona; this is your party.”

CALL FOR SUBMISSION

Call for Native artists around the theme of “Wenonah”. Send a note and a jpg to winonaallcall@gmail.com to be in the exhibit at the Watkins Art Gallery, WSU, Aug. 23-Sept. 14, 2019

 The gallery is a small space, at 600 square feet. Please offer your art accordingly.    

Academic Panel: Winona, Wenonah: In history and today: the legends, the stories and the reality of Winonas  

Realizing that some Winona stories may not be told in the midst of summer, we nonetheless encourage academic summaries and some discussion of Winona stories in history and present times. Please submit a summary of your writing, or your spoken word pieces to winonaallcall@gmail.com   We will let you know. Submissions are due on June l5, 2019.

Visit http://www.winona-all-call.com/artshow to learn more, and instructions for submitting artwork to the gallery.

Celebrate Winona :  Music includes a band and dance with a blues band, Corey Medina and the Brothers, and other special guests who will provide entertainment Saturday night. Weekend plans also include canoe races, hemp mill history tour and a map with places to take selfies with city of Winona landmarks.

There will be a bus tour with local dignitaries and a river cruise on the Mississippi River to see the sites of the town of Winona, a screening of award-winning documentary film First Daughter and the Black Snake, an intimate portrait offering a window into the life and work of Winona LaDuke, and the successful battle against the Enbridge Sandpiper between 2014 and 2016.

There will be a video booth for “Winona” testimonials and opportunities to celebrate with Winona LaDuke.

Saturday night will include a catered Sioux Chef Dinner ( $40 per person, pre reserved $70/couple). Limited seating.  Before we depart, Sunday we will host a traditional round dance to celebrate Winonas and secure a group photo.

This is going to be a once in a lifetime opportunity to be surrounded by a lot of “First Daughters” celebrating being Winona in the city that bears their name.

REGISTRATION along with more information about events, tickets, hotels and camping can be found on the website: https://www.winona-all-call.com/, and facebook: facebook/winonaallcall

For more information please contact:  winonaallcall at gmail.com

 

ACTION ALERT: Ashland County Zoning meeting seeks public to testify on sulfide mining

On Friday, March 8, 2019 at 9 AM the Ashland County Zoning committee will be meeting to move a new set of sulfide mining ordinances out of committee and on to the full board. Zoning Committee Chair Joe Rose Sr. is asking for the public to step up and testify in favor of the new ordinances. The meeting is being held in the Ashland County Board Room.

Tyler Forks, Penokee Hills, Wisconsin

Background: After Gogebic Taconite (GTac) was driven out of the state in 2015, the Wisconsin legislature, dominated by Republicans, overturned the decades-old “prove it first” Wisconsin sulfide mining law. The old law prevented companies that had a proven record of pollution from doing business in Wisconsin. After that law was overturned, the entire state became vulnerable to possible devastating environmental damages that would be caused by such a mine.

Sulfide mining focuses on copper, gold, silver and other precious metals. According to Save the Boundary Waters:

The sulfide-ore copper mining industry has a disastrous track record. A peer-reviewed report prepared by Earthworks studied fourteen sulfide-ore copper mines representing 89% of current U.S. copper production. Of those fourteen mines, all had experienced some sort of pipeline spill or other accidental release. Thirteen of the fourteen (92%) had experienced water collection and treatment failures that resulted in significant impacts to water quality. The tailings dam failure at the Mount Polley Mine in British Columbia in August 2014 shows the catastrophic potential for such failures (Earthworks 2012).

Read about the possible devastation of sulfide mining here. 

Please come to the Ashland County Board Room and speak up in defense of the water.

Yellow mine waste water from the Gold King Mine is seen in San Juan County, Colorado